Nisekoi: False Love, Season 2 – Episodes 1-12 Review

This review is for the second season of Nisekoi. For the first season (episodes 1-20) summary and review, check out this post.

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We’ve finished Nisekoi!

Nisekoi_2nd_V2_BD_BOX

…And we were a bit disappointed.

…And by a bit, I mean a lot.

Well, there’s not point in beating around the bush with a summary. Let’s get into it.

 

Review:  12733-200 12733-200 / 5

Let’s start off with the good points about this season. This season covered backstory for our female leads. We learned Onodera has a sister, Tsugumi has a devout follower and Kirisaki has a complicated relationship with her mother–this in particular was well done. It answered valid questions I had while watching the first season as to why Kirisaki wore the same ribbon every day and where her absent mother was. The episodes–yes, there were two!– devoted to this were probably my favorite ones of the season. The mother-daughter relationship was authentic, and I enjoyed seeing their qualms resolved.

 

But these points are far outweighed by negatives concerning plot and resolution.

One of my biggest gripes was the structure of the series. The majority of the episodes were divided into two, non-related episodes approximately 11 minutes long. While we did get to see a wider perspective, the perspective lacked any depth. For the most part, there was no flow to the episodes–they did not appear sequential or working towards a goal.

Even the answer to the series’ leading question, who holds the key to Raku’s lock, was answered in such a tame manner. It was an aside, which would be acceptable if it was tackled later on in the season, but it wasn’t. We learn the key and lock came from one of Kirisaki’s childhood books from her mother’s internal monologue in episode four, but this information disappears for the remaining eight episodes. The characters themselves don’t learn the truth about the promise, which was the whole driving force of the series. Raku seems aloof at the thought of Haru keeping his lock, which he had kept as a prized possession up until this point. The series ends, not with the lock and key, but with Kirisaki deciding she won’t tell Raku how she feels about him at the moment. The ending left me unsatisfied and frankly, a little more than annoyed.

These inconsistencies in character and plot were a betrayal to the relationship between the writer and the audience. If I can speak frankly, which I can because this is my review, I felt as if this series what brought about just to make money, not to offer anything of substance to the series or the watchers’ experience. Ultimately, I wouldn’t recommend it.

 

Thanks for reading! What are your thoughts? Do you agree or am I way off-base? Let me know in the comments below!

Watch on, Annieme Addict!

~Annie

2 thoughts on “Nisekoi: False Love, Season 2 – Episodes 1-12 Review

Add yours

  1. I actually just finished Nisekoi a few weeks ago myself! Good review, I totally agree.

    Despite the whole yakuza / gangster thing seeming like an interesting idea, they sort of just dropped it after the first few episodes. And the locket story, which was already pretty cheesy, just ended up feeling like a waste of time.

    I think it’s an OK anime to watch if someone is just looking for an average highschool / harem / slice of life anime to pass the time. The overall story was definitely lacking though.

    Like

    1. Thanks for your thoughts!

      Right?! It feels like the creators just dropped the ball on some of the concepts that were actually interesting, despite them being a bit a of a stretch.

      I felt like it wasn’t a bad anime, but there are other slice of life / romance animes that are of higher quality and more satisfying.

      Liked by 1 person

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